Could digital exclusion in payments be a barrier to a COVID-free society?

Could digital exclusion in payments be a barrier to a COVID-free society?

Vince Graziani

CEO at IDEX Biometrics ASA

Views 554

Could digital exclusion in payments be a barrier to a COVID-free society?

27.07.2020 12:00 pm

Cash is in decline in every country around the world. That has only intensified since the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, swiftly leading us towards a cashless society. Many retailers have stopped accepting cash altogether, instead encouraging customers to use contactless card payments or mobile apps to pay in a touch-free, and more hygienic way. Given concerns around the virus staying on bank notes for around 48 hours, and ATMs potentially being touched by hundreds of hands without a deep clean in between, many of us have instead embraced touch-free payments.

Touch-free authentication allows consumers to make a transaction without having to touch a shared PoS to tap in a PIN number, sign for their purchase, or hand over cash. It is common when tapping a contactless card or using a mobile payment app and is an increasingly vital step in the process of making the payments industry safe in the world of coronavirus. Yet, there is a significant segment of society that still rely on cash who are unable to embrace touch-free payment authentication.

As we move more towards a more digital-focused society, Government bodies are increasingly worried about the effects on vulnerable members of society. In particular, the elderly, those who remain un-banked, or those without a smartphone are still reliant on cash and could be left excluded in a digital-first payment ecosystem. In a post-COVID world, these same groups are those who could be most exposed to further viruses from cash circulation.

So, with touch-free payments important to improving hygiene, there is an important question to consider for those unable to access contactless payments: could digital exclusion be a barrier to a COVID-free society?

Bridging the digital exclusion gap
 
Those who are digitally-excluded have limited or no access to digital tech that can make life more convenient, such as a smartphone or payment apps. According to the ONS 9% of UK adults, or almost 5 million people, don’t have access to the internet, while in the USA, FCC data suggests around 42 million Americans lack broadband internet. As a result online banking would be inaccessible to many. In the UK, the Government-commissioned Access to Cash review found that 17% of the population – over 8 million adults – would struggle to cope in a cashless society.
 
Exclusion from the digital world can lead to lower skills and confidence, but it can also lead to social exclusion and a wider impact on economic problems. As payment technology continues to advance, the use of basic IT devices could become essential to access goods and services. While touch-free digital payments offer many benefits, not everyone is ready to embrace a fully digital society just yet. But in our new normal, we must also consider the need to remove the concerns around transmission of the virus on cash.
 
Therefore it is important to be more innovative in our approach to payments and ensure that Governments and banks work together to develop new digital payment technology in a more inclusive way, to bridge the digital exclusion gap.
 
Failure to do so will see those without access to digital services and payment options locked out from everyday services that so many of us take for granted and forced to continue using cash. Meanwhile more digitally-included members of society are able to avoid touching paper notes and coins or ATMs amid the threat of the virus. With more and more banking services moving online the need for simple and secure access to these digital services is more important than ever before.
 
How biometric technology can support digital inclusion
 
In The Access to Cash review, the commission highlights biometrics in digital payments as an innovative technology that will make payments even easier in the future, which will support the pace of change towards a cashless society.
 
Biometrics are likely to be key to revolutionising digital inclusion in the coming years.

As people get used to using fingerprints and faces to identify themselves, biometrics will become a more familiar and accepted touch-free way to validate transactions. Now, fingerprint biometric sensors can be incorporated into smart payment cards providing a speedier, personal and more secure means for consumers to authenticate payments.
 
During a transaction, a consumer only needs to touch their finger to the sensor on their own payment card, and then hold it over the contactless card sensor. This will allow them to authenticate a payment of any amount, without a payment limit. By extending biometrics to payment cards, authentication will no longer rely on what you know, or what you can remember, but who you are. This is valuable for those who struggle with PINs as well as in countries with lower literacy levels or less reliable identification systems.
 
The use of fingerprint biometrics in smart cards are also an affordable way to ensure touch-free authentication in the payment process while effectively banishing the concerns people currently have about the implications of devices being lost or stolen. For those that don’t have access to a smartphone, they will still be able to bank and pay for goods securely and in a touch-free way without a large upfront cost.
 
We have a duty to provide cost-effective touch-free payment methods
 

While tackling digitally exclusion remains complicated, advancements in biometric fingerprint technology are leading the way to a more inclusive payment method. By placing an emphasis on usability, the benefits of touch-free authentication can be made available to all.
 
As we move towards a cashless society, Government bodies have a responsibility to work with payment method providers and banks to ensure those who remain unbanked have access to cost-effective touch-free payment methods, such as biometric payment cards. This will limit a potential second wave and protect vulnerable citizens from the spread of future viruses during the payment process.

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